Posts tagged "History"
Modern Miniaturism: An Interview with Kurosh ValaNejad

Modern Miniaturism: An Interview with Kurosh ValaNejad

The Cat and the Coup is a documentary videogame created by Peter Brinson and Kurosh ValaNejad. You can find their website, and the link through which to download the game for Mac or PC for free, here. Like any good documentarians, Brinson and ValaNejad make liberal use of artistic cues – visual and aural –...
The Bukharian Jews: The Story of a Mizrahi Community

The Bukharian Jews: The Story of a Mizrahi Community

Even at first glance, Aron Aronov has a demanding presence you can’t forget. He doesn’t stand very tall and he dresses in plain dark clothing, but there is something about the way he looks at you that is captivating. His gaze drills into your eyes, and he speaks rapidly, his furrowed brows moving in tune...
Çanakkale: Historical Memory in the Making

Çanakkale: Historical Memory in the Making

One of the most striking visuals that greets a visitor passing through the Dardanelles Strait (known in Turkish as the Çanakkle Boğazı) is this fragment of Turkish verse carved into the hillside: Dur yolcu! Bilmeden gelip bastığın, Bu toprak, bir devrin battığı yerdir. The words are a fragment from a poem by Necmettin Halil Onan. Those are...
Stories of Migration and Globalization from the Subcontinent

Stories of Migration and Globalization from the Subcontinent

Zurich – Dubai On a recent flight from Zurich to Dubai, I had a couple from Switzerland sitting next to me going on their honeymoon to Réunion. They asked me where they could find the movies in German. They wouldn’t understand English, not to mention have any interest in the selection of Arab, Hindi, Telugu,...
Several Loud Cracks in an Almaty Bazaar

Several Loud Cracks in an Almaty Bazaar

On the lowest level of the largest bazaar in Almaty sits a small, unassuming restaurant. A square window and a lone door are the only things marking the business from the rows of nut vendors and thrift marts flanking the eatery. The interior’s not much more memorable: white-washed walls, a handful of tables, and a...
The Volga's Children - Finland

The Volga’s Children – Finland

About 150 years ago, a Tatar man arrived in Järvenpää, a Finnish city 37 kilometers north of the capital of Helsinki. Upon arrival, our hero noticed the land surrounding the town was cheap. The geography was mostly forest and fields, and perhaps it reminded the man of his home back near the Volga river. He...
The Volga's Children - Turkey

The Volga’s Children – Turkey

Mornings in Osmaniye, a tiny village in northwestern Turkey, are so calm that even a light whisper could disturb the silence. Turkeys (hindi, as in “Indian” in Turkish) are running on the dirt roads frightened of the newcomers. A few children ride their bikes up and down the main street, for there is little else...
A Sloppy Vendetta

A Sloppy Vendetta

The Russian judiciary capped its summer – made sunnier by the harsh stare of the international media spotlight – by issuing a verdict that harkened back to the Middle Ages. Three members of now-infamous Pussy Riot have been handed two-year sentences for performing an Anti-Putin “punk-prayer” at the Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior and...
The Pamir Has a History

The Pamir Has a History

A printable version (.pdf) of this article may be found here. Editor’s note: Mr. Steiner’s article and photographs made me think of Solzhenitsyn’s Cancer Ward. The book describes a hospital that was as much a research lab as a palliative hospice in Tashkent, Uzbek SSR. Solzhenitsyn’s view of the Soviet system is clear and is...